JavaScript Menu, DHTML Menu Powered By Milonic
Eisenbrauns Logo - Click to return to the home page

0 items in your cart. View Cart | Check Out

All Books and Software: Biblical Studies: Commentaries and Studies on the Old Testament: Genesis

Adam in Myth and History
  • View larger image

  • Cover art, screen shots, and page scans
  • Submit Text
    Descriptions, reviews, or tables of contents

Adam in Myth and History

Ancient Israelite Perspectives on the Primal Human

by D. E. Callender, Jr.

48
  Create a standing order for this series

2000

List Price: $29.95
Your Price: $27.85
You save: $2.10

This item could ship free to U.S. addresses!
Add this item and $71.15 to your cart to get free shipping.
(This amount may be covered by other items in your cart.)

Availability: In Stock

Permanent link: http://www.eisenbrauns.com/item/CALADAMIN

Please log in to add this item to your wish list.

Table of Contents

Description

The first full-length treatment of the biblical "primal human" traditions in their ancient Israelite setting, this book provides historical-critical analyses of the relevant biblical traditions, sensitive both to the present literary context of the traditions and to their roots in the ancient Near East. The study focuses on Genesis 1-3, Ezekiel 28:1-10 and 11-19, Job 15:7-16, and Proverbs 8:22-31, to reveal the ways various tradents used these intermediary divine-human figures and to examine the underlying social significance shared by such traditions in the cultural milieu of ancient Israel.

Product Details

Publisher: Harvard Semitic Museum / Eisenbrauns
Publication date: 2000
Bibliographic info: xviii + 244 pages
Language(s): English

   

Cover: Cloth

 

Reviews

"This monograph, a revised version of the author's 1995 Harvard Ph.D. dissertation, seeks to establish and examine the thematic and semantic parameters of ancient Near Eastern "primal human" traditions, i.e., traditions whose focus is a primordial human connected with the "creation, the beginning of the cosmos" and therefore belonging "to the period of the first or foundational things."

Comprising the bulk of the study are a number of biblical texts, which Callender argues, either directly or indirectly reflect such traditions.

Of particular focus in the book's first three sections are three characteristic topoi, which Callender sees as shared among the various primal human traditions: location, wisdom, and conflict.

The paradigmatic and intermediary character of the primal human, Callender suggests, can be seen in the language used to describe him which casts him as a royal figure (Gen 1,26-28), a priest (Ezek 28,11-19), and a prophet (Job 15,7-8).

Many of the aforementioned attributes of the primal human have been noted before by others, albeit in disparate publications, and in very different contexts. Where Callender breaks new ground, however, is in his understanding of how these topoi functioned.

This is an interesting and useful study, and certainly the first to make sense of Israelite primal human traditions by drawing on the methodologies of scholars working in the comparative study of religions, especially those of M. Eliade, A. van Gennep, and V. Turner." --Scott B. Noegel, Biblica Vol. 83 - Fasc. 4 - 2002

"A Harvard dissertation prepared under the direction of Jo Ann Hackett and Peter Machinist, this monograph is a useful study of the Adamic traditions as they may be detected in the Hebrew Scriptures, with some attention to the larger Near Eastern milieu, as that informs the understanding. The term that Callender uses to speak of this figure or this tradition is “the primal human.” The basic elements that define the primal human are that the figure is “essentially human, belongs to the primeval era, and has unusual contact with the divine realm” (p. 2)...

Callender’s study is carefully done, and he does not overpress his data into extreme conclusions. The term “conflict” may not be the best to describe the various ways in which these different texts reflect the element of sin in the stories. Nor is it clear that such matters as expulsion from the Garden of Eden have to do with profaning and purity. In other words, the necessary task of uncovering a complex of identifiable motifs in several texts tends to force some compression into a whole that may not be as neat as it sounds. This does not mean that the author ignores difference and complexity...

Both for its treatment of this important theme and for its analysis of individual texts, this monograph will be a valuable resource for the study of the primal motifs in the biblical tradition." --Patrick D. Miller, JNES, October 2003.

"A Harvard dissertation prepared under the direction of Jo Ann Hackett and Peter Machinist, this monograph is a useful study of the Adamic traditions as they may be detected in the Hebrew Scriptures, with some attention to the larger Near Eastern milieu, as that informs the understanding. The term that Callender uses to speak of this figure or this tradition is "the primal human." The basic elements that define the primal human are that the figure is "essentially human, belongs to the primeval era, and has unusual contact with the divine realm" (p. 2). . . . Callender's study is carefully done, and he does not overpress his data into extreme conclusions. The term "conflict" may not be the best to describe the various ways in which these different texts reflect the element of sin in the stories. Nor is it clear that such matters as expulsion from the Garden of Eden have to do with profaning and purity. In other words, the necessary task of uncovering a complex of identifiable motifs in several texts tends to force some compression into a whole that may not be as neat as it sounds. This does not mean that the author ignores difference and complexity. There may be even more that can be done with the theme than is here presented, fulsome as it is. . . . Both for its treatment of this important theme and for its analylsis of individual texts, this monograph will be a valuable resource for the study of the primal motifs in the biblical tradition." --Patrick D. Miller, Princeton Theological Seminary in JNES, October 2003.

Share Your Find!

Shopping Cart


(you can always remove it later)

0 items in your cart.

See above

We ship
worldwide!

Linking
http://www.eisenbrauns.com/item/CALADAMIN
Linking to us? Use this address for this item!See above

E-mail
Click to (or send a note to yourself!)

Blogging tools
Copy the HTML code below to add this item to your online
journal, blog, profile page, website, or on-line forum.

Main Entry

Full Listing (cover, title, full bibliographic information)

Main Entry

Title-only link

Main Entry

Cover-only link

NBRF1NBRF2eis_view_item

Google Book Search